STEEL BUILDINGS AND SNOW! – WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

Steel Buildings and snow - what you need to know Snow and ice can be a real problem for steel buildings.    Here’s what you should know to prepare for the potential heavy weight settling on your roof  which could stay for days!

Steel buildings are strong and durable, with the strength to withstand a heavy amount of snow unlike wooden constructions. All our steel buildings confirm to the British  Standard and are designed for such areas of heavy snow loads. 

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STEEL BUILDINGS DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS

There are several aspects to roof design that require some thought when taking potential snow load into accounts.

  • Roof pitch – the higher the roof pitch, the less the snow accumulates. Areas of high snow fall benefit from almost any level of pitch to encourage snow to drop off the roof. Flat roofs may require snow removal service.
  • Wind load – geographical locations prone to heavy snows probably experience high winds as well.
  • Geometric features – some geometric features tend to accumulate heavier snow loads than others. .
  • Accessories – Snow guards, roof cleats, and other roofing accessories can keep snow distribution more even.

Steel buildings  are sturdy, durable structures designed to withstand wind loads and other extreme weather conditions.

Therefore, If your steel building will be located in an area of the country that commonly experiences snow and ice, we will make sure that it will be structurally sound to withstand heavy snow and wind. 

Furthermore, it is also important to properly insulate the building, especially if it is going to be occupied by people. Other things to consider are avoiding the use of skylights and  placing most of the windows on the south side of building.

Finally, don’t be tempted to cut corners  and buy cheap steel building as it  could cost you dearly in the long term and could even result in the loss of lives.

Contact us now to get your FREE quotation with the correct snow loads and wind speed taken into account.

 

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